Category Archives: Compliance

MAPFRE Settlement- An Expensive Lesson in Data Security

data loss preventionMAPFRE Life Insurance Company of Puerto Rico (“MAPFRE”) has agreed to pay a whopping $2.2 million in fines to enter into a settlement with the HHS Office of Civil rights for violations of the HIPAA privacy and security rules.

At the heart of this multi-million dollar storm was a humble USB pen drive.

On September 29, 2011, the unencrypted USB data storage device was left unsecured in the IT department of MAPFRE. This drive contained records of 2,209 individuals, including their full names, dates of birth and Social Security numbers. The pen drive was stolen overnight.

MAPFRE reported the device theft to OCR 55 days later. (60-days is the maximum time frame for reporting and announcing PHI breaches). OCR then launched an investigation to ascertain whether any HIPAA Rules had been violated. This is standard protocol for all breaches of ePHI that impact more than 500 individuals.

As the investigation proceeded, OCR discovered not one but several HIPAA non-compliance issues.

Officials at OCR determined that MAPFRE showed a callous attitude towards data protection  by not putting necessary safeguards in place to prevent the theft. MAPFRE had-

  • Failed to conduct required risk and vulnerabilities assessments to test the “confidentiality, integrity, and availability” of the ePHI under their control,
  • Did not implement any appropriate security measures
  • Had neglected to implement required security awareness and training programs for their workers.

As per the corrective action plan, MAPFRE was expected to:

  • Conduct a risk analysis and implement a risk management plan
  • Implement process for evaluating environmental and operational changes
  • Review – and revise if necessary – its current Privacy and Security Rules policies and procedures
  • Distribute the policies and procedures and assess, update, and revise them as necessary
  • Give regular training to workforce members and certify they’ve received it

MAPFRE delayed implementation of corrective measures that it had told OCR it would undertake. So despite the submission of a breach report to OCR on August 5, 2011, MAPFRE Life did not start encrypting data on laptop computers and portable storage devices until September 1, 2014.

“Covered entities must not only make assessments to safeguard ePHI, they must act on those assessments as well,” OCR director Jocelyn Samuels said in a statement. “OCR works tirelessly and collaboratively with covered entities to set clear expectations and consequences.”

The resolution amount was decided upon after taking the financial position of MAPFRE into consideration as well as keeping in mind the number and severity of its HIPAA violations. Not only does OCR require payment of $2,204,182 as fines, MAPFRE is also expected to adopt a corrective action plan that addresses all areas of noncompliance.

HHS states on its website, that “A covered entity must identify and analyze potential risks to e-PHI, and it must implement security measures that reduce risks and vulnerabilities to a reasonable and appropriate level.” It also says that “A covered entity must designate a security official who is responsible for developing and implementing its security policies and procedures.”

OCR has increased its enforcement of HIPAA Rules in recent years, with 2016 being a year when they made more settlements than in any other year to date. Last year alone a dozen healthcare organizations settled possible HIPAA violations with OCR. Earlier this year, Presence Health, a healthcare network serving residents of Illinois, agreed to pay OCR $475,000 due to an unnecessary delay in breach notification after the patients’ protected health information was exposed. OCR won’t be letting up on its aggressive enforcement pace of 2016 when it collected a record $23.5 million in HIPAA breach settlements, a steep rise up from $6.2 million in all of 2015.

There are some expensive lessons in these settlements that all HIPAA covered entities should pay heed to. Risk assessment and analysis can go a long way in keeping data secure. There should be a comprehensive risk management plan in place. In case of a breach, companies should make quick and accurate representations to OCR and should follow through on any commitments made to OCR.

Last but not the least, leaving unencrypted portable devices/drives is never a good idea and a humble USB pen drive can sometimes prove to be very very costly.